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Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend?


Friday, April 04, 2008

Comparative effectiveness research holds out the tantalizing prospect of making it easier for patients and their doctors to choose the best treatment, thus improving quality. At the same time, it could also justify denying or reducing payment for a host of treatments or procedures that may be clinically ineffective or unworthy of their high price.

Analysts and policy makers advocate creating an entity that would conduct effectiveness research to allow payers, physicians and the public to make more evidence-based decisions about available treatment options. The Institute of Medicine and the Congressional Budget Office have recently recommended that such research be pursued.

But many questions remain unanswered. Who should conduct such research -- government, the private sector or some combination? Who should decide which interventions to evaluate? Who will pay for it? What lessons, if any, can be drawn from existing comparative effectiveness programs in the public sector, private sector and abroad? How will evidence-based research be balanced against appropriate provider discretion? This briefing, cosponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, addressed these and related questions.

Speakers

 Ed Howard, Alliance for Health Reform, Moderator
 Carolyn Clancy, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Speaker
 Karen Ignagni, America's Health Insurance Plans, Speaker
 Wilhelmine Miller, George Washington University, Speaker
 David Nexon, Advanced Medical Technology Association, Speaker
(Click on the camera icon to see a video of the speaker's presentation.)

Transcript, Event Summary and/or Webcast and Podcast

Transcript: Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend? (Adobe Acrobat PDF), 4/4/2008
Event Summary: Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend? (Word Document), 4/4/2008
Full Webcast/Podcast: Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend?

The transcript, full webcast and podcast for this briefing, as well as videos of individual speakers' presentations, are provided by Kaiser Family Foundation.

Speaker Presentations

Carolyn Clancy Presentation (PowerPoint), 4/4/2008
Karen Ignagni Presentation (PowerPoint), 4/4/2008
Wilhelmine Miller Presentation (PowerPoint), 4/4/2008

(If you want to download one or more slides from these presentations, contact us at info@allhealth or click here for instructions.)

Source Materials

Knowing What Works in Health Care: A Roadmap for the Nation - Report Brief (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Institute of Medicine, 1/24/2008
Research on the Comparative Effectiveness of Medical Treatments (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Congressional Budget Office, 12/17/2008
Setting a Higher Bar: Improving Quality and Safety in Health Care (Adobe Acrobat PDF), America's Health Insurance Plans, 4/19/2007
Government-Funded Comparative Effectiveness Research (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Advanced Medical Technology Association, 10/24/2007
Creating a Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (Adobe Acrobat PDF), American Institutes for Research/MedPAC, 2/1/2008
Getting Better Value for Our Health Spending (Adobe Acrobat PDF), National Institute for Health Care Management, 7/1/2007
The Complexities of Comparative Effectiveness (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Biotechnology Industry Organization, 10/25/2007
Blue Perspective: Improving Health Care Value (Adobe Acrobat PDF), BlueCross BlueShield Association, 9/24/2007
The Science of Improvement (Adobe Acrobat PDF), JAMA, 3/12/2008
Can MCOs Partner with Manufacturers for Comparative Effectiveness Research? (Adobe Acrobat PDF), American Journal of Managed Care, 3/1/2008
Essential Elements of a Technology and Outcomes Assessment Initiative (Adobe Acrobat PDF), JAMA, 9/19/2007
What are the Presidential Candidates Saying about CE Research in Their Health Care Plans? (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Alliance for Health Reform, 3/26/2008
Value-Based Coverage Policy in the United States and the United Kingdom (Adobe Acrobat PDF), National Health Policy Forum, 11/29/2006
Panelist Responses to Unasked Written Questions (Adobe Acrobat PDF), Alliance for Health Reform, 5/1/2008
Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend? (Word Document), Word Document, 4/4/2008
Sourcelist (Word Document), , 4/4/2008

Offsite Materials (briefing documents saved on other websites)

Testimony of Carolyn M. Clancy, MD, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Subcommittee on Health, House Committee on Ways and Means, 6/12/2007
Testimony of Gail Shearer, Consumers Union, Subcommittee on Health, House Committee on Ways and Means, 6/12/2007
Comparison Shopping, The Economist, 1/10/2008
A Test of Bad Health (Op-Ed), New York Times, 10/18/2007
The War on (Expensive) Drugs (Op-Ed), Wall Street Journal, 8/30/2007
Comparative Effectiveness of Health Interventions: Strategies to Change Policy and Practice, ECRI Institute, 10/18/2007

 


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